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"By the end of 2015, card issuers had seen a 25 percent decrease in their fraud occurrences, comparing the fourth quarter of 2014 with the fourth quarter of 2015," Conroy said.

Approximately 20 percent of all their card-present transactions are going through as chip cards.

And the study had at its disposal the actual experience of countries that have already made the move to EMV technology.

"There's a fear of being flat-footed," he said, adding, "You need to double down on efforts." Using your credit cards at brick-and-mortar stores has become much safer since the fall when U. merchants were required by credit card companies to have finalized the rollout of EMV.

The new cards offer an extra layer of security for in-store transactions, depending on how they're used, and so far, they're nearly impossible for fraudsters to replicate.

He notes that while the number of card-not-present (online) fraud victims rose 24 percent last year, the volume of online retail payments was expected to increase 7.7 percent, to reach $407 billion.

EMV will eventually nudge card hackers to move most of their efforts online, but "criminals have been conducting online fraud for many years in the U. According to Javelin, the number of victims of card-not-present fraud reached 6 million in the United States in 2015, up from 4.8 million in 2014.

As that number sharply declines starting next year, with more EMV systems in place and the $4 billion in card fraud expected this year gets worked out of the system, that will put increased focus on three other types of fraud.

The study estimates that the majority of fraud, or roughly .2 billion, will be use of stolen credit card numbers online and in mobile channels, known as card-not-present fraud. in 20 immediately after it went to EMV, and in Canada even more so, application fraud sharply spiked," Conroy said.

Application fraud — when information stolen in a hack is used to open new credit card accounts, such as with the Anthem health insurance breach — will hit .1 billion by 2020. Michael Thelander, iovation's product marketing manager, said that w A third type of fraud, called account takeover, whereas hackers use compromised data to log into consumer and business online accounts and drain them of money, could reach more than

The study estimates that the majority of fraud, or roughly $7.2 billion, will be use of stolen credit card numbers online and in mobile channels, known as card-not-present fraud. in 20 immediately after it went to EMV, and in Canada even more so, application fraud sharply spiked," Conroy said.Application fraud — when information stolen in a hack is used to open new credit card accounts, such as with the Anthem health insurance breach — will hit $2.1 billion by 2020. Michael Thelander, iovation's product marketing manager, said that w A third type of fraud, called account takeover, whereas hackers use compromised data to log into consumer and business online accounts and drain them of money, could reach more than $1 billion by 2020.Thelander said many companies have tools in place to combat fraud, such as for card-not-present charges (the $7.2 billion estimate), but they may not be prepared for the sudden uptick."We should still be going to EMV, but people should not get a false sense of security." The iovation/Aite Group study's estimate of $10 billion in fraud that's coming in the next four years is an educated guess, but the sources of the data should have all merchants, banks and consumers concerned.The study's authors interviewed 16 of the largest credit and debit card issuers in the United States, representing two-thirds of the credit card holders in the country, as well as the four largest payment processors.Some card-not-present problems stem from stores not having a secure enough payments system online, where "merchants have been left on their own to figure out how to protect their online channels from fraud," said Mark Horwedel, CEO of Merchant Advisory Group, nodding to the aggressive directive by credit card companies for stores to implement EMV, which right now doesn't solve anything for web-based shopping.

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The study estimates that the majority of fraud, or roughly $7.2 billion, will be use of stolen credit card numbers online and in mobile channels, known as card-not-present fraud. in 20 immediately after it went to EMV, and in Canada even more so, application fraud sharply spiked," Conroy said.

Application fraud — when information stolen in a hack is used to open new credit card accounts, such as with the Anthem health insurance breach — will hit $2.1 billion by 2020. Michael Thelander, iovation's product marketing manager, said that w A third type of fraud, called account takeover, whereas hackers use compromised data to log into consumer and business online accounts and drain them of money, could reach more than $1 billion by 2020.

Thelander said many companies have tools in place to combat fraud, such as for card-not-present charges (the $7.2 billion estimate), but they may not be prepared for the sudden uptick.

"We should still be going to EMV, but people should not get a false sense of security." The iovation/Aite Group study's estimate of $10 billion in fraud that's coming in the next four years is an educated guess, but the sources of the data should have all merchants, banks and consumers concerned.

The study's authors interviewed 16 of the largest credit and debit card issuers in the United States, representing two-thirds of the credit card holders in the country, as well as the four largest payment processors.

Some card-not-present problems stem from stores not having a secure enough payments system online, where "merchants have been left on their own to figure out how to protect their online channels from fraud," said Mark Horwedel, CEO of Merchant Advisory Group, nodding to the aggressive directive by credit card companies for stores to implement EMV, which right now doesn't solve anything for web-based shopping.

||

The study estimates that the majority of fraud, or roughly $7.2 billion, will be use of stolen credit card numbers online and in mobile channels, known as card-not-present fraud. in 20 immediately after it went to EMV, and in Canada even more so, application fraud sharply spiked," Conroy said.

Application fraud — when information stolen in a hack is used to open new credit card accounts, such as with the Anthem health insurance breach — will hit $2.1 billion by 2020. Michael Thelander, iovation's product marketing manager, said that w A third type of fraud, called account takeover, whereas hackers use compromised data to log into consumer and business online accounts and drain them of money, could reach more than $1 billion by 2020.

Thelander said many companies have tools in place to combat fraud, such as for card-not-present charges (the $7.2 billion estimate), but they may not be prepared for the sudden uptick.

"We should still be going to EMV, but people should not get a false sense of security." The iovation/Aite Group study's estimate of $10 billion in fraud that's coming in the next four years is an educated guess, but the sources of the data should have all merchants, banks and consumers concerned.

billion by 2020.

Thelander said many companies have tools in place to combat fraud, such as for card-not-present charges (the .2 billion estimate), but they may not be prepared for the sudden uptick.

"We should still be going to EMV, but people should not get a false sense of security." The iovation/Aite Group study's estimate of billion in fraud that's coming in the next four years is an educated guess, but the sources of the data should have all merchants, banks and consumers concerned.

The study's authors interviewed 16 of the largest credit and debit card issuers in the United States, representing two-thirds of the credit card holders in the country, as well as the four largest payment processors.

Some card-not-present problems stem from stores not having a secure enough payments system online, where "merchants have been left on their own to figure out how to protect their online channels from fraud," said Mark Horwedel, CEO of Merchant Advisory Group, nodding to the aggressive directive by credit card companies for stores to implement EMV, which right now doesn't solve anything for web-based shopping.

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