America american dating practice

In the early settlements, poor families ate from trenchers filled from a common stew pot, with a bowl of coars salt the only table adornment.

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Here might be found coffee, tea or chocolate, wafers, muffins, toasts, and a butter dish and knife...

The southern poor ate cold turkey washed down with ever-present cider.

Hooker [Bobbs-Merrill Company: Indianapolis IN] 1981(p. 67) "English settlers in teh seventeenth century ate three meals a day, as they had in England...

For most people, breakfast consisted of bread, cornmeal mush and milk, or bread and milk together, and tea.

Even the gentry might eat modestly in the morning, although they could afford meat or fish...

Dinner, as elsewhere in the colonies, was a midday, through the wealthy were like to do as their peers in England did, and have it midafternoon..England's gentry had a great variety of food on te table...In 1728 the Boston News Letter estimates the food needs of a middle-class 'genteel' family. Dinner consisted of pudding, followed by bread, meat, roots, pickles, vinegar, salt and cheese. Each famly also needed raisins, currants, suet, flour, eggs, cranberries, apples, and, where there were children, food for 'intermeal eatings.' Small beer was the beverage, and molasses for brewing and flavoring was needed.Butter, spices, sugar, and sweetmeats were luxuries, as were coffee, tea, chocolate, and alcoholic beverages other than beer." ---A History of Food and Drink in America, Richard J. The answer depended upon where they came from and where they landed. Augustine ate differently from the English people in Jamestown, the Dutch in New York and the French in South Carolina.Settlers brought their recipes, cooking methods and some supplies with them.In the towns, the usual mug of alcoholic beverage consumed upon rising was followed by cornmeal mush and molasses with more cider or beer.

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